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Robert Coxe

Robert Coxe is a professional ecologist and botanist who has worked as the State Ecologist of Delaware and as an ecologist for the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. He is also a former Past-President of the Pennsylvania Academy of Science. He currently is an innkeeper at McMullen House Bed & Breakfast LLC and a web designer for Silphium Design LLC.

Flower cluster of velvetleaf milkweed (Asclepias tomentosa) in a wooded setting.

Velvetleaf Milkweed (Asclepias tomentosa), a Comprehensive Guide in 10 Sections

Velvetleaf Milkweed (Asclepias tomentosa) is a herbaceous perennial that is found in the southeastern United States from North Carolina to Florida and in Texas. This plant is a host to three butterflies, including the Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus). It can grow from 2 to 3 feet tall and has flowers that are greenish to white with tints of pink and maroon that bloom from April to August. It is hardy in zones 7-10.

Yellow flowers of savannah milkweed (Asclepias pedicellata).

Savannah Milkweed (Asclepias pedicellata), a Comprehensive Guide in 10 Sections

Savannah Milkweed (Asclepias pedicellata) is a herbaceous perennial that is found in the southeastern United States from North Carolina to Florida. This plant is a host to three butterflies, including the Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus). It can grow from 0.5 to 1 foot tall and has flowers that are yellow to green in color that bloom from May to July. It is hardy in zones 7-10.

Flower cluster of Long-leaf Milkweed (Asclepias longifolia).

Long-leaf Milkweed (Asclepias longifolia), a Comprehensive Guide in 10 Sections

Long-leaf Milkweed (Asclepias longifolia) is a herbaceous perennial that is found in the mid-western and eastern United States and Canada, except for the northeast. This plant is a host to the Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) and Queen butterfly (Danaus gilippus). It can grow from 1 to 2.5 feet tall and has flowers that are greenish-white with a purple tinge that bloom from April to July. It is hardy in zones 8-10.

Close-up of white flower cluster of Red-ring milkweed (Asclepias variegata).

Red-Ring Milkweed (Asclepias variegata), a Comprehensive Guide in 10 Sections

Red-Ring Milkweed (Asclepias variegata) is a herbaceous perennial that is found in the mid-western and eastern United States. This plant is a host to the Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) and Queen butterfly (Danaus gilippus). It can grow from 1 to 3 feet tall and has flowers that are white with a purple to red ring at the base that bloom from May to July. It is hardy in zones 3-9.

White flowers of four-leaf milkweed (Asclepias quadrifolia) in a wooded setting.

Four-leaf Milkweed (Asclepias quadrifolia), a Comprehensive Guide in 10 Sections

Four-leaf Milkweed (Asclepias quadrifolia) is a herbaceous perennial that is found in the mid-western and eastern United States. This plant is a host to the Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) and Queen butterfly (Danaus gilippus). It can grow from 1 to 3 feet tall and has flowers that are pink to white (cream) that bloom from April to July. It is hardy in zones 5-8.

Plant of California milkweed (Asclepias californica).

California Milkweed (Asclepias californica), a Comprehensive Guide in 10 Sections

California Milkweed (Asclepias californica) is a herbaceous perennial that is found in California and adjacent parts of Mexico. This plant is a host to the Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) and Queen butterfly (Danaus gilippus). It can grow from 3 to 4 feet tall. The flowers have been described as lavender, pink, white, green, maroon, red, purple and violet and bloom from April to July. It is hardy in zones 7-10.

Pearl Crescent on a twig.

Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos), a Comprehensive Guide in 12 Sections

The Pearl Crescent is found in most of North America, except for the Pacific Northwest and the martime provinces of Canada. It is a member of the family Nymphalidae and is in the subfamily Nymphalinae. This butterfly was first named and described by Dru Drury, a British entomologist in Illustrations in Natural History in 1773. This brown and yellow butterfly utilizes plants from the Aster Family (Asteraceae) as hosts.

Silver-spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus) on Lantana.

Silver-spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus), a Comprehensive Guide in 12 Sections

The Silver-spotted Skipper is one of the most wide ranging skippers in North America. It is a member of the family Hesperiidae and is in the subfamily Pyrginae. This butterfly was first named and described by Pieter Cramer, a Dutch entomologist and merchant in De Uitlandsche Kapallen (1775). A brown colored skipper, it generally uses plants from the Legume Family (Fabaceae).

Monarch Butterfly (Danaus plexippus) on orange flower.

Monarch Butterfly (Danaus plexippus), a Comprehensive Guide in 12 Sections

The Monarch Butterfly is one of the most well-known butterflies in North America. It is a member of the family Nymphalidae and is in the subfamily Danainae. This butterfly was first named and described by Carl von Linnaeus in 1758 based on collections by Mark Catesby. A distinctive orange and black butterfly, it utilizes plants of the genus Asclepias (Milkweeds) as a host plant.

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