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Butterflies

Pearl Crescent on a twig

Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos), a Comprehensive Guide in 12 Sections

The Pearl Crescent is found in most of North America, except for the Pacific Northwest and the martime provinces of Canada. It is a member of the family Nymphalidae and is in the subfamily Nymphalinae. This butterfly was first named and described by Dru Drury, a British entomologist in Illustrations in Natural History in 1773. This brown and yellow butterfly utilizes plants from the Aster Family (Asteraceae) as hosts.

Silver-spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus) on Lantana.

Silver-spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus), a Comprehensive Guide in 12 Sections

The Silver-spotted Skipper is one of the most wide ranging skippers in North America. It is a member of the family Hesperiidae and is in the subfamily Pyrginae. This butterfly was first named and described by Pieter Cramer, a Dutch entomologist and merchant in De Uitlandsche Kapallen (1775). A brown colored skipper, it generally uses plants from the Legume Family (Fabaceae).

Monarch Butterfly (Danaus plexippus) on orange flower.

Monarch Butterfly (Danaus plexippus), a Comprehensive Guide in 12 Sections

The Monarch Butterfly is one of the most well-known butterflies in North America. It is a member of the family Nymphalidae and is in the subfamily Danainae. This butterfly was first named and described by Carl von Linnaeus in 1758 based on collections by Mark Catesby. A distinctive orange and black butterfly, it utilizes plants of the genus Asclepias (Milkweeds) as a host plant.

Plant of roundleaf goldenrod (Solidago patula) in a wooded setting.

Roundleaf Goldenrod (Solidago patula), a Comprehensive Guide in 10 Sections

Roundleaf Goldenrod (Solidago patula) is a herbaceous perennial that ranges from the mid-western to eastern United States. This plant, along with other goldenrods, is an important nectar source for many insects in the fall, including the Monarch butterfly. It can grow from 2 to 6 feet tall and has alternate, obovate leaves with serrate margins. The golden yellow flowers bloom from August to September and it is hardy in zones 3-8.

Yellow flowers of Pine-Barren Goldenrod (Solidago fistulosa) in a woodland.

Pine-Barren Goldenrod (Solidago fistulosa), a Comprehensive Guide in 9 Sections

Pine-Barren Goldenrod (Solidago fistulosa) is a herbaceous perennial that is found on the coastal plain of the east coast of the United States. This plant, along with other goldenrods, is an important nectar source for many insects in the fall including the Monarch butterfly. The golden yellow flowers bloom from July to November and it is hardy in zones 3-9.

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